Hearing cancelled on Texas student IDs

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In this Oct. 1, 2012 photo, Kayla Saucedo, an 8th grader at Anson Jones Middle School, uses her new ID card to check out a book in the library in San Antonio, Texas. The San Antonio school district\'s website was hacked over the weekend to protest its policy requiring students to wear microchip-embedded cards tracking their every move on campus. A teenager purportedly working with the hacker group Anonymous said in an online statement that he took the site down because the Northside school district "is stripping away the privacy of students in your school." All students at John Jay High School and Anson Jones Middle School are required to carry identification cards embedded with a microchip. They are tracked by the dozens of electronic readers installed in the schools\' ceiling panels. (AP Photo/San Antonio Express-News, Bob Owen) RUMBO DE SAN ANTONIO OUT; NO SALES

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AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Locator chips embedded in student IDs by a Texas school district has set off a debate over privacy and religion after one student refused to participate.

San Antonio's Northside Independent School District put the chips in the ID badges of 4,200 high school and middle school students.

School officials say they could receive up to $1.7 million in additional state funding if the technology enables more accurate attendance counts.

But the parents of a 15-year-old sophomore say the potential of more school funding doesn't outweigh privacy and religious rights.

A judge in San Antonio had been expected to decide Wednesday whether the student could transfer. But the family's attorney says the hearing was cancelled after the school district asked that the case be moved to federal court.

A new hearing hasn't been set.

 
 
 

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